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UVI Professor Dies in 'Tragic Accident'

Oct. 24, 2005 – Evelyn Lallemand, a professor at the University of the Virgin Islands died Sunday in what the university deemed a "tragic accident" at her home in Solberg.
Little is known about the nature of the accident, though one source said she appeared to have fallen from her balcony.
Novelle Francis, Territorial Police Chief, said Monday the V.I. Police Department Major Crime Unit was awaiting the outcome of an autopsy to determine the cause of death and subsequent classification of the death. Francis ruled out suicide.
Lallemand was a native of Haiti, according to a release from UVI . She first came to the university in the summer of 2001 to work as a cross-cultural workshop leader at the university's Summer Institute for Future Global Leaders. Three years later, in the spring of 2004, she was hired to teach French at the school.
Lallemand started the Francophone Club on the university's St. Thomas campus and was involved in promoting French heritage in the V.I. and Haiti.
She was part of a panel discussion organized by Senate President Lorraine Berry during French Heritage Week in June. Lallemand spoke on the "Haitian Quest for Democracy and Economic Development."
She was beloved by her students, the release said, several of whom traveled with her to St. Maarten and Paris.
No information about survivors or funeral arrangements was immediately available Monday.

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